Posted 5 hours ago

thepeoplesrecord:

socialjusticekoolaid:

Last Night in Ferguson (9.28-9.29): Last night’s protest was one of the in Ferguson this month, proving once again that the residents of Ferguson/STL County are some of the most resilient and inspiring in all the land. The police were literally holding peaceful protesters hostage late into the night (folks who were complying with all police requests) so they could negotiate with the remaining folks to leave, but the protesters didn’t back down. Eventually all arrestees were released, and many plan to be back out there tonight.

Injustice in Ferguson continues, but despite it, community now thrives too. This is still happening. Are you still paying attention? #staywoke #farfromover

You cannot jail the resistance!

Posted 7 hours ago

brandos:

Elvin: Sorry, Mrs. Huxtable, I didn’t know you did that kind of thing.
Clair: What kind of thing?
Elvin: Serve.
Clair: Serve? Serve whom?
Elvin: Serve him. [referring to Cliff]
Clair: Ohhh, serve him? As in serve my man?

image

(Source: michonnes)

Posted 8 hours ago

http://mugglebornheadcanon.tumblr.com/post/97099615536/678-during-the-almost-empty-holiday-season-at

mugglebornheadcanon:

678. During the almost empty holiday season at Hogwarts, a teacher stumbles across a muggleborn who is singing their version of What’s This? from the Nightmare Before Christmas, and they don’t know whether to tell them to go back to their common room or laugh. All they hear is, “What’s this,…

Posted 9 hours ago

dailychrisevans:

Shirtless Chris Evans on the set of Captain America: The First Avenger

Posted 10 hours ago

polykins:

stop the phrase “tattle-tale”. stop indirectly telling kids that if they speak up about someone that’s bothering them, they’re doing something bad. stop contributing to the culture of abuse.

(Source: sparkedsky)

Posted 11 hours ago

princessjanecrocker:

thinkmexican:

Paloma Noyola: The Face of Mexico’s Unleashed Potential

When a report emerged in September 2012 that a girl from one of Matamoros’ poorest neighborhoods had attained the highest math score in Mexico, some doubted its veracity. It must be fake, they said.

But it wasn’t fake. Her name is Paloma Noyola, and what most reports failed to mention is that almost all of her classmates also scored very high on the national math test. 10 scored in the 99.99% percentile.

Paloma and her classmates also scored in the top percentile in language. Something special was happening at José Urbina López primary school in Matamoros, and Wired went to take a look.

The high test scores turned out to be the work of a young teacher who also came from humble beginnings. Sergio Juárez Correa was tired of the monotony of teaching out of a book and wanted to try something new to help engage his students when he came across the work of Sugata Mitra, a UK university professor who had innovated a new pedagogy he called SOLE, or self organized learning environments. The new approach paid off.

Although SOLE usually relies on unfettered Internet access for research, Juárez and his students had very limited access. Somehow, he still found a way to apply Mitra’s teachings and unleash their potential.

From the beginning, Paloma’s exceptional abilities were evident:

One day Juárez Correa went to his whiteboard and wrote “1 = 1.00.” Normally, at this point, he would start explaining the concept of fractions and decimals. Instead he just wrote “½ = ?” and “¼ = ?”

“Think about that for a second,” he said, and walked out of the room.

While the kids murmured, Juárez went to the school cafeteria, where children could buy breakfast and lunch for small change. He borrowed about 10 pesos in coins, worth about 75 cents, and walked back to his classroom, where he distributed a peso’s worth of coins to each table. He noticed that Paloma had already written .50 and .25 on a piece of paper.

As Mr. Juárez implemented more of Mitra’s teachings in his classroom, Paloma continued to stand out as an exceptionally gifted student:

Juárez Correa was impressed. But he was even more intrigued by Paloma. During these experiments, he noticed that she almost always came up with the answer immediately. Sometimes she explained things to her tablemates, other times she kept the answer to herself. Nobody had told him that she had an unusual gift. Yet even when he gave the class difficult questions, she quickly jotted down the answers. To test her limits, he challenged the class with a problem he was sure would stump her. He told the story of Carl Friedrich Gauss, the famous German mathematician, who was born in 1777.

When Gauss was a schoolboy, one of his teachers asked the class to add up every number between 1 and 100. It was supposed to take an hour, but Gauss had the answer almost instantly.

“Does anyone know how he did this?” Juárez Correa asked.

A few students started trying to add up the numbers and soon realized it would take a long time. Paloma, working with her group, carefully wrote out a few sequences and looked at them for a moment. Then she raised her hand.

“The answer is 5,050,” she said. “There are 50 pairs of 101.”

Juárez Correa felt a chill. He’d never encountered a student with so much innate ability. He squatted next to her and asked why she hadn’t expressed much interest in math in the past, since she was clearly good at it.

“Because no one made it this interesting,” she said.

Although this Wired piece focuses mostly on Sugata Mitra, it does once again highlight the story of Paloma Noyola. Unfortunately, after a brief spurt of media attention, little on Paloma was ever mentioned and, as was pointed out by Wired, nothing was ever said of Mr. Juárez.

As with most stories in the Mexican press — and those popular with the middle-class — things suddenly become very important once it’s featured in a gringo publication. Which is a very sad commentary. We hope, however, that this story pushes those in the press, state and federal government to look not to the United States for validation but to Mexicans like Sergio Juárez doing good work in places like Matamoros.

The clear message in this story is that there are thousands of Paloma Noyolas going to school in Mexico who, just like her at one time, are not being challenged and therefore aren’t very interested in school. This story can, if we want it to, raise enough awareness to shift the discussion from poverty to opportunity.

Paloma truly personifies both Mexico’s challenges and unleashed potential.

Read the entire Wired story here: How a Radical New Teaching Method Could Unleash a Generation of Geniuses

Editor’s note: As an addendum, Wired provided information on helping support Sugata Mitra and his School in the Clouds project, and although they donated school supplies and equipment to José Urbina López School, we’re interested in seeing if we can help set up a similar fund for Sergio Juárez, the teacher featured in this story.

Also, $9,300 was raised to help fund Paloma’s education last year. We’re going to follow up with the economist who led the fundraising campaign to see how she’s doing. Stay tuned for the updates.

Stay Connected: Twitter | Facebook

Excellence
Posted 11 hours ago

micdotcom:

The Wall Street Journal would like you to meet the “broke” Americans making $400K a year

With the national poverty line hovering around $16 a day, 46.5 million Americans live in poverty, including 20.4 million living under half the poverty line. Millions of Americans live on less than $2 a day. 

Luckily, those millions have some new friends to commiserate with: Americans making $400,000 a year. Yes, according to the Wall Street Journal’s new video, “Do You Make $400,000 a Year But Feel Broke?”, there’s a whole segment of the population in need of your sympathies — the 2 percenters.

'Do you make $400,000 a year, but feel broke?' 

Posted 12 hours ago

supernatasha:

part-ofthecult:

Hogwarts Founders
» Idris Elba // Lucy Liu // Hrithik Roshan // Angel Coulby

While I do love that whoever made this did a good job matching actors to characters, the one issue I have is that Hogwarts is in England and what founded several centuries ago. I’m not saying that there wouldn’t have been blacks or asians in England at the time, but it’s still a historical inaccuracy to depict them as anything other than white Englishmen, since the culture of England at the time wouldn’t have had room for blacks and asians as anything other than slaves or traders.

Please don’t take this as me being racist, this is just me with a debilitating and incurable need for historical accuracy.

So let’s see. The Sorting claims it’s origins about a thousand or so years ago in it’s song, which implies the 1000s. JK Rowling described them as “medieval," which is about 500 to 1500, again agreeing with our 1000 date. So let’s work with that. We’ve got a pretty decent timeline to work with here. 

There have been black people in Scotland since “classical times,” and black moors present in James IV’s royal court in the 1500s, plus there’s St. Deiniol in Wales in the 500s, implying black people were also in the religious court instead of all just slaves and servants. Therefore, could a strong and fearless future-Gryffindor have ancestry native to the Isles? Hmmm.

Hannibal of Carthage was definitely not white (at least not in the modern sense). As a matter of fact, many Mediterranean descended people are mixed with Central Asians, South Asians, and North Africans so… But anyway, in 1555, black men were learning to be interpreters in London to help with trading in the Ghanian region. Here’s a coat of arms with black people on it dated 1616. Also, literally how do you not know about Dido Elizabeth Belle, an aristocratic lady of Scotland from the 1700s???

The Romani migrated out what is now modern day India and Pakistan in about the 1000s, so add in that they’re wizards who can fly and all that jazz, they could’ve easily gotten there within a year or two and settled in Scotland once they learned white people weren’t treating them very kindly. There you go, that’s how a South Asian Slytherin made it to Scotland just in time to found Hogwarts.

Here’s desi people of color from the Indian subcontinent, called Lascars, who had been sailing in Europe from as early as the 1400s, possibly earlier, still fitting that there could’ve been wizards in the British Isles about a hundred or so years earlier. Art from the 1600s showing brown men in turbans. Here’s an Indian man who in the 1700s ran a successful restaurant in England and taught white people to shampoo their hair lol.

Japanese emissaries came to Europe as early as 1584 and observed there were already Chinese and Japanese slaves among the overwhelmingly black slaves, something blamed on Christianity, which was part of the reason why Japan vehemently became isolated from that point.

Also about East Asia, Mongolian Genghis Khan made it to about Poland-ish in the 1200s, so it’s not a far bet to say the Chinese (who were also conquered by Khan on his way to Europe) could’ve found their way to Scotland around that time or a few hundred years earlier. Along with a smart cookie who would go on to be the founder of Ravenclaw.

Native Americans, of course, have been present in Europe for a while. In the 1500s, Manteo and Wanchese arrived in London. There’s evidence the Vikings and Indigenous Americans were friendly long before when Columbus blah blah, and there’s even evidence of Native Americans in Holland that’s like 2000 years old. Could a kind and loyal future Hufflepuff be one of those mixed race indigenous American-Africans?

ALSO considering the fact that Binns (the history professor at Hogwarts) specifically stated that witches and wizards were being persecuted and Hogwarts was built out of sight of Muggle eyes, it’s completely possible that POC came to Scotland and built the castle happily for other magical humans to have a safe place. Since HP universe is a fantasy anyway, read these article while you’re at it.

So yeah, I understand your implication that you don’t want to be racist or anything like that (bc being called racist is ofc so much worse than actually being ignorant), but POC were not just traders and slaves in the British Isles, they were a fuckton of other things your history books aren’t telling you (or trying to intentionally steer you away from). So me having an all-brown cast for a location in a dominantly-white place I’m sure is irking the fuck out of you, and that makes me so glad to see you confronted with that “incurable” need for historical accuracy you have.

And check out this rad blog: Racebending Harry Potter.

Posted 13 hours ago
Posted 14 hours ago

iwriteaboutfeminism:

There are some great posters in Ferguson tonight!

September 28th

Posted 14 hours ago

npr:

Masses of pro-democracy protesters continue to pack the streets in Hong Kong, defying police who have responded with tear gas. The demonstrators are angry that Beijing has insisted on vetting all candidates for the territory’s next chief executive.

Here’s a closer look at the issue and what’s at stake.

Photo: Chris McGarth, Getty Images

Posted 14 hours ago

socialjusticekoolaid:

Today in Solidarity (9.27.14): The Lost Voices campground since Mike Brown’s murder was ransacked by police… so petty. #staywoke #farfromover

Don’t know who the Lost Voices are yet? They’re the youth brigade on the frontlines of Ferguson, leading the fight for justice for Mike Brown. (Many of those tweets you see on my posts are from LV.) Yesterday, their campsite was raided without notice. These young leaders have been under constant attack from police since protests began, but yesterday was a clear intimidation move. Well guess what— Lost Voices will not be intimidated or stopped.  Please make sure you’re showing them your love and support. Consider donating to their efforts today. 

Posted 14 hours ago

thatawkwarddisneymoment:

If Disney Princes Were Real

Posted 15 hours ago

insanity-and-vanity:

The only appropriate response to “trends men hate”

(Source: lerosier)

Posted 16 hours ago

missespeon:

auwa:

fiztheancient:

fireskink:

jacketlizard:

jetgreguar:

grandmasterflash:

tumblr you can keep your glorified nostalgia about the wild thornberries and tony hawk’s pro skater and getting to hold the flea-ridden stuffed lion during the d.a.r.e program and what have you because THIS right here.  now THIS was the essence of the 90s

YOU’LL CALL NOW

oh man it took me literally 2 seconds of this video to remember exactly how the rest of it went

I hated this commercial. Turns out I still hate it.

OH MY GOD THIS DAMN COMMERCIAL

I CAN’T FUCKING STOP LAUGHING its as awful as i remembered it

i cant quite explain this commercial and how it came back to me like

i couldnt remember the exact words by heart but. everything they said chimed in my head like a song i’d heard a long time ago. it was almost rhythmic, buried deep in my memory. it was probably the most bizarre way ive ever remembered something.